Animals

Hawks In South Carolina

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There are several different species of hawks in South Carolina, each of which has its own unique appearance, size, and lifestyle. It is well known that the open plains, grasslands, and deserts of both Canada and Mexico are the primary habitats of the hawks that may be found in North America.

Some hawks do make their homes in more wooded locations, but overall, they favor expansive stretches of open fields. Let us now look at these hawks in South Carolina!

 

What are Hawks In South Carolina?

Hawks In South Carolina
Hawks In South Carolina

The Red-tailed Hawk and the Sharp-shinned Hawk are the two species of hawk that are found in South Carolina. The Red-tailed Hawk is the larger of the two. The Red-tailed Hawk is the species of hawk that is seen the most frequently in South Carolina.

Hawks are birds of prey that hunt and consume prey such as other birds, small animals, snakes, and frogs in addition to their own kind. Hawks have a vision that is sensitive to ultraviolet light, which assists them in tracking down their prey.

If you want to see hawks in South Carolina, you should look in wooded areas for the smaller species, such as the Sharp-shinned Hawk and the Cooper’s Hawk, and open grassland, marshes, or high ridges for the bigger species.

The Red-tailed Hawk and the Sharp-shinned Hawk are the two species of hawk that are found in South Carolina. The Red-tailed Hawk is the larger of the two. The Red-tailed Hawk is the species of hawk that is seen the most frequently in South Carolina.

Hawks are birds of prey that hunt and consume prey such as other birds, small animals, snakes, and frogs in addition to their own kind. Hawks have a vision that is sensitive to ultraviolet light, which assists them in tracking down their prey.

If you want to see hawks in South Carolina, you should look in wooded areas for the smaller species, such as the Sharp-shinned Hawk and the Cooper’s Hawk, and open grassland, marshes, or high ridges for the bigger species.

 

Read also: Tarantula Wasp Hawk; Everything You Need To Know

 

What Are 5 Species of Hawks In Sc?

1. Red-Shouldered Hawk

Hawks In South Carolina
The Red-Shouldered Hawk

The Red-shouldered Hawk is a resident bird that can be seen throughout the year in South Carolina. They frequently hunt in the vicinity of damp woodlands, typically along the banks of streams and ponds. They are fairly common and are found on 13% of checklists in the state of South Carolina.

Red-shouldered Hawks have distinctive markings, including a checkered pattern of black and white on their wings and a barring pattern of rusty red on their breasts. They are approximately the same size as a crow but somewhat smaller than a swan and have a tail that is heavily banded. They communicate with a resounding cack-cack-cack-cack call.

2. Sharp-Shinned Hawk

Hawks In South Carolina
Sharp-Shinned Hawk

Adult Sharp-tailed Sandpiper Hawks have a chest that is reddish-orange in coloration and a rear that is blue-gray. They have shady bands running the length of their tails.

Even though they are difficult to spot, people have reported seeing them soar through open regions on the outskirts of woodlands. They are quite nimble and can move quickly through thick vegetation in order to pursue their songbird prey, which is typically in flight.

They are occasionally observed at feeders where they are spotted catching tiny birds; however, if you have issues with them in your backyard, you should remove the feeder for a few weeks.

Sharp-shinned Before consuming their food, hawks strip their victim of its feathers on a stump or low branch. Typically, they consume songbirds that are roughly the size of a robin.

Nests of the Sharp-shinned Hawk are frequently found in conifer trees behind dense cover, typically near the crowns of particularly tall trees. The diameter of the nest ranges from one to two feet, while the depth ranges from four to six inches. They can lay anywhere from three to eight speckled white or light blue eggs.

 

Read also: Pest Control Camden SC

 

3. Red-Tailed Hawk

Red-Tailed Hawk
Red-Tailed Hawk

The Red-tailed Hawk, according to its name, is easily identifiable by its characteristically short and broad red tail. They are enormous birds, between the size of a crow and a goose, and have broad, rounded wings. The undersides of most Red-tailed Hawks are white, while the backs of their heads and tails are brown.

It is common practice in the film industry to employ the high-pitched, descending, raspy-screech sound of the Red-tailed Hawk for all raptors. They consume rodents, birds, and reptiles among other things.

Nests can be found high up in extremely tall trees, on the ledges of cliffs, and even on the tops of big structures and towers. They produce two to three eggs that are pale with dark blotches. Red-tailed Hawks are prevalent in South Carolina, accounting for 10 percent of all sightings in the state. They can be found in South Carolina during the entire year.

They are also the easiest to notice, as they circle slowly over vast areas looking for prey. This behavior may often be observed on lengthy vehicle drives. You might also spot them sitting atop utility poles or telephone poles.

4. The Northern Harrier Hawk

These hawks are somewhere between the size of a crow and a goose, and they have long, broad wings that are proportionally long. They frequently fly in a v-shaped pattern, with the tips of their wings positioned higher than their bodies. The females are brown, while the males are gray on top and white on the bottom, and they have a white patch on their rump.

The majority of a Northern Harrier’s diet consists of small birds and animals. They construct their nests on the ground among thickets of plants such as brushtails, reeds, or willows. They lay 4-5 eggs that are a dingy white color.

Both the Northern Harrier and the Hen Harrier are medium-sized birds of prey that make their nests in either Europe or Asia. Iceland is home to both the northern and Eurasian harriers, however, the Eurasian harrier is not found there.

The length of these hawks ranges from 16 to 20 inches (41 to 52 cm), and their wingspans range from 38 to 48 inches (97 to 122 cm). After spending the summer and fall breeding in Canada and the northern states of the United States, the Northern Harrier spends the winter in South Carolina.

Three percent of the documented checklists in South Carolina on birds contain observations of these birds. When flying low over grassland or marshes, you could spot this slender hawk with a long tail.

 

Read also: 18 Most Dangerous Birds in the World

 

Tip-Off: The Broad-Winged Hawk In South Carolina

Buteo platypterus, sometimes known as the broad-winged hawk, is a genuine raptor and is one of the most common species of hawk found in North America. It has a wingspan of forty inches, brown feathers on its back, white feathers covering its front, yellow legs, and brown feathers covering its back.

Small birds, rabbits, and squirrels make up the majority of the broad-winged hawk’s diet of choice when it comes to prey. Although it is most commonly seen in deciduous and mixed forests, it is also possible to spot it perched in areas close to bodies of water.

There is evidence that the broad-winged hawk can be found in the United States all the way from North Carolina to Florida and even further west into Texas.

Ememobong Umoh is one of the prominent authors of Pestclue. He is an undergraduate who is experienced in the field and has written numerous mind thrilling articles about insects and animals.

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