How To Use Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

With a jet spray reaching up to 15 feet away, the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol offers immediate knockdown of wasps, hornets, and other pests.

This aerosol eliminates the threat before it has a chance to sting. It is capable of coating dangerous wasp and hornet nests from up to 15 feet away.

Keep reading to discover more usage guides!

 

Description of the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

Wasp Freeze Ii Aerosol
A Picture of the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

Wasp Freeze II Aerosol is an aerosol spray that kills wasps and hornets within five seconds of contact, especially if their nests are near your home.

By instantly knocking out wasps so quickly that no stinging pheromone is emitted, this specially formulated wasp killer aerosol significantly lowers the likelihood of getting stung.

Further applicator safety is achieved with Wasp Freeze II Aerosol’s potent jet spray function, which can reach wasp nests up to 15 feet away.

Utilizing this formula with its strong dialectic strength and lack of breakdown at 47,400 volts means that it is safe to put on nests near electrical equipment.

 

Read also: How To Get Rid Of Grass Carrying Wasps

 

How To Use Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

  • Follow the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol Label Instructions and Apply:

Before using the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol can, shake it thoroughly, hold it upright, back away from the nest as far away as possible (it can spray up to 15 feet away), and then spray, being careful not to get any of the product on you or anyone else nearby, as well as to avoid having it drift into undesirable areas.

Using a sweeping motion to saturate the mist and target any wasps that attempt to dodge the spray, completely wet the nest with Wasp Freeze II.

Wasps within the nest will be eliminated immediately, and any that re-enter it later will be subject to residual control. After applying, wait a full day before removing the nest from your property.

When dealing with ground nests, keep a safe distance from the aperture, then use a sweeping motion to spray the area, making contact with any yellowjackets or bees that attempt to flee.

After taking a few steps forward, spray straight into the nest hole for six to eight seconds.

 

Read also: Best Powder for Killing Wasps

 

According to the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol Label Where Can I Apply?

  • Attics
  • Crawlspaces

 

When To use the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

If you have come across wasps in the vicinity or have come across a wasp or hornet’s nest constructed around the building, use Wasp Freeze II.

Since wasps and hornets gather on or in the nest at night, the ideal times to spray this product are in the evening or early morning.

 

What are the Target Pests of the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol?

  • Bees
  • Hornets
  • Spiders
  • Yellowjackets
  • Wasps

 

Read also: Plants to Keep Wasps Away

 

What is the Shelf Life According to the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol Label?

When stored in a dry, cool case, Wasp Freeze II Aerosol can survive for three years.

 

Additional Product Information?

What are the Active Ingredients?
  • 0.1% Of Prallethrin
What are the Possible Areas of Application?
  • Indoors
  • Outdoor
What Is the Chemical Type? Insecticide
Does this Product Have any Usage Restrictions? No
Which Products Can Be Compared To This Product? Stryker Wasp and Hornet Killer
Is It Safe To Use Around Children and Pets? Yes, it is safe to use around children and pets.
What Is Its Formulation? Ready to Use

 

Where To Buy Wasp Freeze II Aerosol?

 

Watch the Explanatory Video on How To Use the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol

 

Conclusion

The best time to apply the Wasp Freeze II Aerosol is in the evening or early morning since wasps and hornets gather in the nest while the sun is down.

The residual effects of this insecticide aerosol spray help ensure the complete elimination of the nests you treat.

Thank you for reading!

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